The Chinese authorities have arrested 15,000 for Internet-related crimes

The Chinese authorities decided to “clean up the internet” and took aim at the internet gaming operators and other businesses that operate online. Their latest action resulted in thousands of arrests across the country. How is this of any concern for the top affiliate networks? Well, for the next six months, the Chinese government will lead an operation to combat and eradicate some of the biggest internet crimes, including identity theft, hacking attacks, credit card fraud and illegal gaming.

These may concern the top affiliate networks

 

The “Clean the internet“ campaign

The campaign started by the Chinese authorities is called “Clean the internet” and its first phase of action yielded impressive results: more than 15,000 arrests in approximately 7,500 cases. Some of the arrested are internet gaming operators who offered all kinds of services in their niche. Some top affiliate networks may be interested in the fact that, for example, one game hosted by the gaming operators acted as a de facto lottery by using a randomizer tool to send cash prizes to players on a social networking app. The officials said that they were after internet fraudsters of all sizes, who were described as “tigers and flies”.

In one other case, the arrested suspects overtook a company’s website and filled its pages with online gaming content. It appears that the arrested ones have allegedly hacked into 2,000 company websites. No involvement for top affiliate networks has been reported as of yet.

The tigers and flies

China has the biggest internet population in the world, with 668 million Internet users. It’s only normal that, with the expansion of the Internet, the potential cybercrimes are also growing. According to the country’s National Computer Networks Emergency Response Technical Team, SMS messages containing links to malware have been particularly on the rise. Even if the top affiliate networks would never stoop to doing such a thing, the overall population can be affected by such practices. Last year alone, one such piece on malware was able to infect 110,000 users across the country.

The Chinese authorities are also after what it finds to be offensive and harmful content posted on the Internet. The content in question includes gun-related violence, pornography and gaming. 66,000 websites and web posts are investigated by China in this matter.

China is internationally known for its online censorship, and the country had made a priority to increase the rules and regulations for the content found on the Internet, particularly on social media platforms.

In conclusion

The “Clean the internet” campaign is only targeting internal perpetrators (for now), but the recent events should serve as a warning sign for the top affiliate networks who are considering handling operations in China. The local government takes this campaign very seriously and wants to lock down the internet by putting a few thousand people behind bars.